Debt Negotiation Advice – When to Use Professionals to Negotiate Debt Settlements

Debt Negotiation can be defined as the procedure of working with creditors and debt collectors to lower your total debt load. It is a very powerful technique for those who have previously performed debt consolidation but are struggling to make payments. Negotiation should be saved as an option of last resort to pay off debts. If you have a small amount of debt, there are more effective tools you should use to manage or eliminate your debt. Since negotiation will drastically lower your credit rating, it should be employed only when you have no alternatives for repaying a large amount of debt. A person in debt can attempt negotiation on his own or use professionals that can work with creditors to drastically lower the total amount of debt due.

If you have had disputes with your creditors or if you are not a strong negotiator, then you should consider hiring a professional debt settlement negotiator. They possess the wherewithal, experience, and expertise needed to get you the best possible deal to repay your debt. The top companies can lower your debt by 60 % and the time it takes to become debt free by up to 70%. They can also lower your interest rate and penalty fees. If you have enough cash to repay 40-60% of your debt this is the most cost-effective option you have. Once you enter into a negotiation you should discontinue making payments and begin setting that money aside to make a lump sum payment.

A professional debt negotiator can negotiate your debt settlement since he has access to individuals at your creditors with the authority to lower your debt. You will receive a better settlement by working with a professional opposed to doing it yourself; professionals understand the process of negotiating with creditors to lower your debt. They know the tactics and how to work within constraints; they can lower your likelihood of your creditors suing you.

It is imperative to compare insurance quotes before choosing an insurance policy. When you compare quotes you are guaranteed to save time and money because you will undoubtedly find the lowest possible quote.

With the ongoing recession it has never been more vital to value your money and compare insurance quotes on the internet. A good starting point is a website that lets you compare insurance quotes online at no cost.

Scrapbooking Ideas – Creating Scrapbook Presents

One known fact about Christmas is that it’s a season for sharing and giving – thus the concept of presents. While you can take the easy road out and cut “gift” images from magazines or patterned papers and wrappers, you can also take the creative way – making a present for your scrapbook. Aside from d├ęcor, these presents can also be used as a peek-a-boo for photos and hidden messages, giving your scrapbook a fun and exquisite side.

Scrapbooking ideas such as presents on a layout create a unique look for any scrapbook. To make these presents, you’ll need cardstock, glue, punchers, scissors, kaleidoscopic thin ribbons and a wide array of small embellishments such as sequins, brads and stickers.

First of all, you need to cut the cardstock to the size of the present. Make sure to leave a small, but adequate fold on the side if you plan to create a hinge opening for your present. Create the wrapper by pasting sequins, small stickers and punched designs onto the cardstock. Draw little words if you’d like an almost-wrapper look-alike.

Secondly, snip thin and even pairs of ribbon that will fit the size of the present you’d like to make. Cross the ribbon over each other on top of the cardstock. With a small strip of ribbon, curve your own ribbon for a final ribbon finish and place above the first crossed pair.

Last, glue the fold of the cardstock onto the back of the photo. Then glue the photo and the fold onto the background. If you’re more patient, you can create two halves of a present and have the opening in the middle.

Getting To “Yes” – Negotiating With Panache

I have recently helped several clients negotiate better contracts for themselves. Not just better financially, but more aligned with professional goals they have and the types of work they actually enjoy doing. Negotiation is a steep learning curve for many, but vital to understand.

Getting to “Yes” – Negotiating with Panache

The higher you climb up the professional ladder, the more your daily work life revolves around negotiations for both you and your team mates. Most people initially think of salary packages when considering negotiation skills. However, these skills can range from eliciting help from colleagues to getting support for your new ideas from more senior colleagues and board members.

Identify your main goal for the negotiation and where you would be prepared to compromise. Always go in asking for a bit more than you would like, more money for a project, more salary or holiday entitlement, more funding for staff training. If you have an idea of what your main goals are, the areas on which you compromise will seem like “gifts” or concessions to the other side, making you appear more reasonable and willing to negotiate.

Do not remain so attached to the idea of “winning” the argument. Putting your point of view forward without seeming to be attached to the results helps others lower their guard, relax and be able to see your perspective. Going in with a cross to bear only elicits resistance and tension in others. If you stick to the benefits and logic of an argument, often others will embrace it and sometimes even think of it as their idea – a major benefit if you want implementation more than recognition.

Top Tips for Effective Negotiation

1. Assume everyone has influence. When trying to land a sale or impress at an interview, never assume you know who is completely in charge. Heads of organisations often take advice from a wide range of people, so don’t concentrate your efforts only on one person. A kind word for a secretary or personal assistant often helps just getting you the interview slot you want and in fact, many executives will solicit information about your demeanour from their staff. So don’t wait to turn on the charm until you see the whites of the CEO’s eyes – greet everyone with respect.

2. When entering a negotiation, listen to the other side first. You will frequently hear priorities that overlap with your point of view. Verbally recognise these points and build them into a foundation for the concept you are proposing. Listening also conveys that you want this to be a collaborative process, a good start for any negotiator.

3. Verbally reflect what they are saying to convey that you understand what they want. Use phrases like “What I hear you saying is-” or “If I understand you correctly -”. This allows them to correct any miscommunication while demonstrating they are truly being heard; an invaluable asset for any negotiation.

4. After listening, start by emphasising the points with which you agree. Shared priorities and experiences allow differences of opinion to be only one part of the story of how you both want to move forward.

5. If you can, phrase all of your questions in an open manner avoiding answers that are likely to begin with “No”. Limiting the usage of this word keeps the atmosphere feeling collaborative, not combative.

6. At the end, summarise the agreements, actions points and compromises each side will be taking from the meeting and minute the details as this can eliminate problems or back-tracking later on.